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Another Cause for School Shootings No One is Talking About

Think about what your life would be like if you showed up to work every day and no one was willing to talk to you. You spend the entirety of your workday sitting alone in the corner of the office while others socialize. Your presence is only recognized when others tell you what to do or harass you.

This is the reality many of our youngsters face every single day at school — and the reason many psychologists are linking to violence at schools.

Guns themselves don’t cause school shootings. Rather, it is the formation and steadfast allegiance to rigid social cliques that cause our teens and tweens to snap.

The thinkers behind the little-known yet clique theory insist the exclusive groups that form during the school years shape identities, career paths and success. Anyone who has attended a large public high school won’t find it hard to imagine why.

Sociologists are fascinated by the formation of cliques at large schools and the lack of such restrictive social groups at smaller schools. This phenomenon is partially attributable to the fact that students educated at small schools are forced to interact with one another in projects, group work, sports and other activities. Alternatively, those learning at schools with hundreds or thousands of teens have the opportunity to segregate into social cliques.

To say such cliques are destructive would be the understatement of the millennium. One need not look further than the recent string of school shootings to justify the previous statement.

Once enough students are enrolled at an educational institution, a critical mass of sorts is reached that causes the formation of exclusionary social cliques. It is a foregone conclusion some students will not fit in with a specific clique and become social outcasts. These outcasts are the “untouchables” of the school social caste system. They are teased, physically harmed and isolated from their peers. They sit alone in the corner of the classroom, silent until called upon by their teacher. These untouchables are potential school shooters to-be.

School shooting survivors-turned-celebrities like David Hogg and Emma Gonzalez take great pride proclaiming, “The youth will win!” They insinuate the problem of school violence is solely the fault of adults who insist on retaining their right to bear arms. In reality, access to guns is not the problem. The underlying cause of the burgeoning school violence is social exclusion.

It is no secret youngsters are judgmental and particularly harsh toward those who do not fit in. Social segregation based on looks, class, race, athletic ability and other variables is an inevitability once the forementioned critical mass of student enrollment is reached. The real problem is that kids are willing to exclude their ugly, unathletic, economically disadvantaged and social awkward to win favor with their peers and solidify their position within social cliques.

It’s typical for the left to say the pro-gun crowd simply lacks compassion. Perhaps they need to look in a mirror.

~ Ready to Fire News


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